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RJ45 Sensor Hub June 7, 2011

Posted by rik94566 in aquaponic automation, aquaponics, arduino, CAT 5 Cable, DIY aquaponics, DS18B20, Float Switch, Hacks, indoor aquaponics, indoor gardens, indoor growing, sensor, Sensor Hub, Standards, Temperature Probe.
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Now that I have established my standard for sensor connections I will need build the hub to hook up the sensors.  So I build a 2 connector RJ45 jack hub to test the sensors that I build.  This hub will allow me to test different sensor configurations and arduino sketches for test sensors  as I develop them.

Here is what it looks like.

RJ45 Sensor Hub Connector

End view of terminals

I have marked the terminals on both ends so there can be no confusion as to what connections are being used.  Make sure you have test all the connections with your multimeter.  That way you know for sure everything is working before you start testing situations with sensors.

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Instructable Published on work done on the DS18B20 June 1, 2011

Posted by rik94566 in aquaponic automation, aquaponics, arduino, CAT 5 Cable, DIY aquaponics, DS18B20, Home Depot, indoor aquaponics, indoor gardens, indoor growing, Instructables, Lowes, Rj45 connector, sensor, Stainless Steel Temp Probe, Standards, Suppliers, Temperature Probe.
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Tonight I pulled all the posts from my work on the DS18B20 assembly and put it into an Instructable for anyone interested.  I will see how how many views it will generate.

Published Instructable

Completed DS18B20 Temp Probe assembly & fully tested now May 30, 2011

Posted by rik94566 in aquaponic automation, aquaponics, arduino, CAT 5 Cable, DIY aquaponics, DS18B20, Hacks, indoor aquaponics, indoor gardens, indoor growing, Rj45 connector, sensor, Standards, Temperature Probe.
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Now that I have completed the Stainless Steel (DS18B20) Temp Probe with CAT 5 cable and RJ45 jack assembly I am ready to perform the finial test.  Using the RJ45 female connector I completed in the last blog section I am ready to test.  Here is what it all looks like to perform this last test.

LAST TEST OF ALL CONNECTIONS AND COMPONENTS

Using the arduino Sketch below will determine if the connections are all working for this completed assembly.

/*
Testing Sketch to test construction of temp probes using DS18B20 IC for Stainless Steel probes.
Sketch was created by Miles Burton and changed to display both C and F temperatures using the serial
monitor for display.

created on 11/20/10
by rik kretzinger   version 1.3
*/

#include <OneWire.h>
#include <DallasTemperature.h>

// Data wire is plugged into pin 8 on the Arduino
#define ONE_WIRE_BUS 8

// Setup a oneWire instance to communicate with any OneWire devices (not just Maxim/Dallas temperature ICs)
OneWire oneWire(ONE_WIRE_BUS);

// Pass our oneWire reference to Dallas Temperature.
DallasTemperature sensors(&oneWire);

void setup(void)
{
// start serial port
Serial.begin(9600);
Serial.println(“Dallas Temperature IC Control Library Demo”);

// Start up the library
sensors.begin();
}

void loop(void)
{
// call sensors.requestTemperatures() to issue a global temperature
// request to all devices on the bus
Serial.print(“Requesting temperatures…”);
delay(1000);
sensors.requestTemperatures(); // Send the command to get temperatures
Serial.println(“DONE”);
delay(1000);

Serial.print(“Temperature for Device 1 is:              “);
Serial.print(sensors.getTempCByIndex(0)); // Why “byIndex”? You can have more than one IC on the same bus.
// 0 refers to the first IC on the wire.
Serial.println(”  C”);
Serial.print(“FAHRENHEIT CONVERSION                     “);
Serial.print(((sensors.getTempCByIndex(0)*1.8)+32));  // test this line
Serial.println(”  F”);
Serial.println();
}

RESULTS (if all connections are working – fig 1.1 below)

1.1 -- Connections working correctly

Should you get results like these (below – fig 1.2)  – you have a problem with your connection somewhere in the assembly.  They will need to be corrected before you can use the assembly being tested.

1.2 -- Problem with connections

Build the DS18B20 – RJ45 testing plug May 29, 2011

Posted by rik94566 in aquaponic automation, aquaponics, arduino, CAT 5 Cable, DIY aquaponics, DS18B20, Hacks, Home Depot, indoor aquaponics, Lowes, Rj45 connector, sensor, Standards, Suppliers, Temperature Probe.
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Now that I have a  DS18B20 temp probe connected to CAT 5 cable with RJ45 jack the unit is compete. But I don’t know if all the connections are working.  So it is time to test the completed assembly. The only way to accomplish this task is to construct a RJ45 female  plug with a CAT 5 cable end.

Female RJ45 connector with CAT 5 cable

I purchased my RJ45 female connector at Home Depot as I like this brand of connector.  It is easy to use and I get consistent results.  Lowes sells a different type connector, but it will work just the same.  I will use the 3 wire standard configuration with the CAT 5 cable (ORANGE-BLUE-BROWN).  I have cut away all other wires of the CAT 5 so there will be no confusion as to connections to be made.  I also stripped the wire ends to allow for clips to be attached.

Testing the assembly is now the next step.  To do this, I will need to use my multimeter set to the conductivity mode.  The multimeter probes can be used either way for testing.  You will get the same results.

Testing connections with multimeter

Test each wire with the correct position inside the RJ45 female plug.  When you touch the probe ends to the correct points the multimeter will beep.  Should this not happen you will need to redo the connections.  Keep testing until you get consistent results.  Once you are sure all connections are working move on to test the completed DS18B20 temp probe assembly.

DS18B20 Temp Probe — CAT 5 Hook-up May 15, 2011

Posted by rik94566 in aquaponic automation, arduino, CAT 5 Cable, DIY aquaponics, DS18B20, indoor aquaponics, indoor gardens, Stainless Steel Temp Probe, Standards, Temperature Probe.
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It is time to connect the DS18B20 temperature probe to a CAT 5 cable.  This will allow me to create a BUS for as many temperature probes as I need for my aquaponic units.

WIRE   CONNECTIONS:

Temp Probe                  ——–                      CAT 5

RED                          =====                     BLUE

YELLOW                 =====                   ORANGE

BLACK                     =====                    BROWN

Connections with shrink tubing

Only thing left to do now is add shrink tubing to the connection between the probe and cable and place a RJ45 connector to the end of the CAT 5 cable.  Now it is possible to make my probes as long as I want and have a standard way to connect the probes to  an arduino for reporting temperatures.

Complete connections

Make sure to test the probe and connections and make sure the probe is working correctly.

Temp Probe – DS18B20 — 2 wire configuration and tested May 12, 2011

Posted by rik94566 in aquaponic automation, aquaponics, arduino, DIY aquaponics, DS18B20, indoor aquaponics, indoor gardens, sensor, Stainless Steel Temp Probe, Standards, Temperature Probe.
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In so many cases there is never just one solution to a situation.  So is the case here.  DS18B20 can be connected using only a two wire configuration.  If you want to cut down on wire or have only two wires to work with the mission can be accomplished

2-wire configuration

In the 2-wire configuration the resistor is connected to the signal (YELLOW)  lead from the probe and connected with the resistor in between the power (RED) side of the arduino.  The arduino signal wire  (YELLOW) connection is taken off the signal side of the resistor.

When the sketch test is run, results are generated as expected.

2-wire configuration - correct readings from sketch

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Temp Probe – DS18B20 — 3 wire configuration and tested May 11, 2011

Posted by rik94566 in aquaponic automation, aquaponics, arduino, DIY aquaponics, DS18B20, indoor aquaponics, indoor gardens, sensor, Stainless Steel Temp Probe, Standards, Temperature Probe.
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Here is how I got my DS18B20 Stainless Steel Temp probe connected using a 3 wire configuration.  This set up uses BLACK – RED – YELLOW leads out of the temp probe.

3 wire connection - resister between Signal and Power

Correct reading were generated with this configuration.  This result comes from sketch that was shown in the 5/8/2011 post.  Please go there if you would like a copy of the sketch.

Correct readings are generated

 

Here is the results from running the sketch:

 

DS18B20 – Temp Probe — connections on wrong side of resistor May 10, 2011

Posted by rik94566 in aquaponic automation, aquaponics, arduino, DIY aquaponics, DS18B20, indoor aquaponics, indoor gardens, indoor growing, sensor, Stainless Steel Temp Probe, Standards, Temperature Probe.
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If your connections are wrong when working with the Stainless Steel Probe the  read out results will not make sense.  One possible mistake can be if you connect the signal wire (yellow wire) to the power side (red wire) of the resistor.

Signal connection on power side of resistor

This connection configuration will lead to the following results using the testing sketch in post on 5/8/2011.

Results from signal connection on power side of resistor

Failure – often times results in learning new things! May 6, 2011

Posted by rik94566 in aquaponics, arduino, general, Hacks, Standards, Temperature Probe.
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If every time you try something new and it works you never learn anything. I knew this from years of doing different things, but the point was made clear again over the last few weeks. Being new to electronics work this is ever so important. Arduinos can do so much and the creativity that this platform allows is unbelievable. Often times I find that what is not said or documented is as important as the final tutorials. In most of the blogs and tutorials I read they only talk about or list the working version of the project. This is fine in most cases, but to trouble shoot a project when it does not work because of some error is helpful for the person doing the project. I think all tutorials and blogs should document the errors and results of wrong connections to help trouble shoot the project or be able to know in the future where to look for problems should the project malfunction. So from now on I am going to talk about my failures and problems I have encountered on my builds. I feel this is important so I and others can understand how to work out of problems and see results that don’t make sense and know how to fix them.

DS18B20 – Stainless Steel Temp Probes – Build vs Buy April 23, 2011

Posted by rik94566 in aquaponic automation, aquaponics, arduino, DIY aquaponics, indoor aquaponics, indoor growing, Stainless Steel Temp Probe, Standards, Temperature Probe, Uncategorized.
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Knowing tempetures in aquaponics is very important. I track outside temp, media temp in center of grow bed, media temp at top of grow bed and fish tank temp. I do this for each grow bed. I track this so I know the impact it has on DO (dissolved oxygen) and what I can grow and when. Case in point, once my media temps goes over about 72 degrees F my Cilantro bolts (goes to a flowering state) not good.

Being this is aquaponics it is important to use only stainless steel item in systems or fish encounter problems. There are a number of DS18B20 probes being produced, but the majority are in a steel case.

Not finding any stainless steel probes I resorted to building my own. Very labor intensive process. Lots of time in sourcing parts, manufacture of the tube casing, testing each step in the process. Total cost of each probe came to around $7.50 not counting my time which came to about an hour per probe.

I was reading another blog about arduino and found a new site called http://www.yourduino.com. Decided to check it out. It looked good so I checked out the sensor section, there they were – the probe I had been looking for and at the right price. Needless to say I place my first order. They came, I hooked them up tested them and now I have a new source of reliable Stainless Steel temp probes.

I will be blogging about the connection process and testing and about pulling off the HEX code of each probe. This is important stuff when working with one-wire protocol. This is now my new standard to be used.